Chicagoan Shekar Jayaraman talks about his experience on new Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking’

Chicagoan Shekar Jayaraman talks about his experience on new Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking’

By Melkorka Licea. July 21, pm Updated July 21, pm. Is the bloom off the rose … ceremony? After dropping on July 16, Twitter is already awash with hot takes and memes about the eight-episode saga led by Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia, known as Sima Auntie to her clients. Taparia — who travels between India and the US in search for the perfect matches for her picky patrons — seems to have her work cut out for her as she sets up six lovelorn singles with different romantic prospects. And while matchmaking may seem like an outdated means to marriage, several of the potential matchees admit that dating apps and online courting are to blame for their relationship woes and are ready to take a more old-school approach to finding love.

That Matchmaking Show

The Netflix hit “Indian Matchmaking” has stirred up conversations about issues like parental preference in marriage, cultural progress, casteism — and ghosting. Taparia answered questions via email from Mumbai, discussing why none of the matches worked out, her own arranged marriage and how business is booming despite the coronavirus pandemic.

Sima Taparia: They are not separate things.

But unlike most reality shows, which have long since become shows about what it’s like to be on a show, the cast here is triangulating so many.

Irrespective of background, educational qualifications, religion and caste, there is something every, single, carefree year-old Indian has in common with his or her fellow citizens: an endless stream of friends and well-meaning relatives haranguing them to get married. In this country, the couple life is still revered as the only legitimate way for adults to seek happiness despite hard evidence to the contrary; overcrowded family courts spilling over with people seeking divorce.

This obsession with matrimony has been fed in no small way by the entertainment industry when the extended family, with all its structures and tensions continues to be the safest storyline for filmmakers in Bollywood. Generations of moviegoers knew you can have three hours of traversing familiar territories of yearning, betrayal and matriarchal interference, secure in the knowledge that the conclusion will be a glittering and tearful wedding. Marriage is no trifling matter and Indians will settle for nothing less, in fiction or otherwise.

Which is why, it is surprising that it took this long for reality TV to examine the changing nature of relationships in 21st century India, where ancient traditions naturally clash with shifting gender roles. Though there are a growing number of career women across sectors, TV is not ready to celebrate their independence and they get little or no representation on cable. It appears that no matter how much people may crave to flee from them in private, their preference is to watch the joint family, for leisure.

The proof of the pudding is in the surfeit of successful soap operas currently on air, showcasing actors dressed in gaudy finery and celebrating obscure tradition. Set between the US and Mumbai, the show traces the life and career of a formidable something matchmaker Sima Taparia and her clients as she helps them navigate, arguably, one of the most important decisions of their lives.

The matchmaking show everybody’s so conflicted about

Coronavirus: How Covid has changed the ‘big fat Indian wedding’. India’s richest family caps year of big fat weddings. A new Netflix show, Indian Matchmaking, has created a huge buzz in India, but many can’t seem to agree if it is regressive and cringe-worthy or honest and realistic, writes the BBC’s Geeta Pandey in Delhi.

Korean matchmaking show fei cheng wu rao is wildly. Chinese a motorcycle stunt. Besides checking all the voice recordings. Love and.

It might seem strange to invoke an Alice Walker essay in connection with the new Netflix reality series, Indian Matchmaking , but, here we go. The essay is revolutionary for that coinage. Walker explicitly draws a connection between skin color and marriage. Walker tells us two smaller, adjoining stories, about herself and a friend in their single days. In the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking , the importance of skin color arrives quickly in talk of matrimony, as do other facets of packaged appearance, the sorts that indicate a notion of a stratified universe: This level of education matches with this one, this shade of skin with this, this height with this, these family values with these, this caste with this, this region with this, and so on.

In the series, she takes on clients in India and America, young desi men and women who seem, for all their desire to get properly paired off, equally conflicted about the whole endeavor. The women work and travel; they like their lives and have friends who offer the sort of support a spouse might. All seem to want, at some level, simple, non-transactional, unconditional affection. At the same time, they talk in transactional terms.

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Every reality show has at least one villain. As Sima and the show itself frequently remind us, arranged marriage is not quite the form of social control it used to be; everyone here emphasizes that they have the right to choose or refuse the matches presented to them. But as becomes especially clear when Sima works in India, that choice is frequently and rather roughly pressured by an anvil of social expectations and family duty.

In the most extreme case, a year-old prospective groom named Akshay Jakhete is practically bullied by his mother, Preeti, into choosing a bride. Indian Matchmaking smartly reclaims and updates the arranged marriage myth for the 21st century, demystifying the process and revealing how much romance and heartache is baked into the process even when older adults are meddling every step of the way.

Though these families use a matchmaker, the matching process is one the entire community and culture is invested in.

Netflix’s latest dating show, Indian Matchmaking, has been met with mixed reviews since it dropped on the streaming site, with many accusing it.

See the gallery. Title: Indian Matchmaking —. A four-part documentary series following young adults on the autism spectrum as they explore the unpredictable world of love, dating and relationships. A Suitable Girl follows three young women in India struggling to maintain their identities and follow their dreams amid intense pressure to get married.

The film examines the women’s complex relationship with marriage, family, and society. In this reality show, couples overcome obstacles to celebrate their love in surprise dream weddings designed by three experts in less than a week.

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This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. In fact, my husband and I were set up by a mutual Aunty family friend. The rest of the show is fun in the usual reality TV ways: with dramatic visuals of a sanitized Mumbai; characters that viewers will root for and others we are expected to loathe; beautiful clothes, awkward dating banter and even some genuine chemistry. Like all reality television, there is both fiction and fact in the show.

In my experience, the helpful some might say busybody Aunties are real. I know Sima.

And this show aptly shows that we haven’t even begun to. We can live in the biggest cities in the world with 21st century trappings, but our minds.

It turns out the outspoken, and “stubborn,” breakout star of Netflix’s controversial new reality dating show ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is a romantic after all. She spoke with us recently by phone about dating and relationships. The hit show itself is about a matchmaker named Sima who helps arrange a marriage—a traditional form of courtship and matrimony in India—for clients all over the world.

Every episode follows a mix of Indians and Indian-Americans as they share their romantic hopes and dreams with Sima. They’re then matched up with other hopefuls and go out on dates. Multiple singles are set up with other singles. But Aparna is, without a doubt, the stand-out. She’s a feisty, successful woman who loves traveling and does not suffer fools. Perhaps what’s most admirable about watching Aparna on the show was that she’s not the average woman looking for a companion– she has a full understanding of who she is and what she wants and doesn’t want just anybody.

But it’s been fun exploring with them and checking out places in Houston,” Aparna said. I was terrible at throwing axes, but it was actually a lot of fun.

For Chicago lawyer, life after ‘Indian Matchmaking’ has been ‘an adjustment’

The notion of teaching them to adjust is at the crux of her process, as she works with entire families to find the right partner for their would-be brides and grooms. In some ways, the show is a modern take on arranged marriage, with contemporary dating horrors like ghosting and lacking the skills for a meet-up at an ax-throwing bar. But issues of casteism, colorism and sexism, which have long accompanied the practice of arranged marriage in India and the diaspora, arise throughout, giving viewers insight into more problematic aspects of Indian culture.

As an Indian-American girl growing up in Upstate New York, one part of my culture that was especially easy to brag about was weddings.

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I was worried about the judgement that would come with it. I had to sit with that for a while and evaluate my reaction. It became very evident that I was trying to protect the problematic nature of traditions in my culture. The way love is defined changes over time, alongside our accessibility to the world; one screen swipe away. This system is global and established politically as well as socially. Traditions in India have perpetuated these ideals to an unhealthy standard, which explains why the biggest selling beauty product in India is a skin lightening cream.

The skin lightening obsession is perpetuated by the Indian caste system, which consists of the wealthiest at the top – the lighter-skinned Indians, while the bottom has the darker-skinned poorer community, who are heavily mistreated. The caste system combines inequality of wealth, colourism, within religion and education – all of which is based around patriarchal methods of governing.

This is controlled with arranged marriages. Choosing someone based on the colour of their skin is prejudice. While Sima Aunty asked the Punjabi Rupam whether she must marry a Sikh, she never listed a Muslim as a potential lover.

‘Indian Matchmaking’: The Dark Reality Behind Your Latest Netflix Binge

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Controversial Matchmaking Show Helps Netflix In Battle For India: Foreign Media​. ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is an eight-episode series (courtesy.

Indian Matchmaking is a Indian documentary television series produced by Smriti Mundhra. Indian Matchmaking was released on July 16, , on Netflix. Mundhra named the casting the biggest hurdle of the show, going through a client list of families and calling to see if they were willing to be on camera. Mundhra also noted that the series initially started with about a dozen singles but with some that “fell off” during production.

The show received mixed reviews between critics and social media users. In addition to showing ” classist ” and ” casteist ” stereotypes, the show was criticized for whitewashing the idea of arranged marriages. The Los Angeles Times followed up with the couples appearing on the show and reported that they are not together anymore. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved The Hollywood Reporter.

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